The View From Here: One Read Art Exhibit Call for Submissions

Thompson Research Center, Photo by Kyle SpradleyThe View From Here
A One Read Art Exhibit
Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia)

“The sky is our sea here, our object of contemplation in all its moods and shades. My father taught me to observe it…My father loved to watch, in autumn, the long scarves of lonely birds, flying, finally together, toward home.”
~ George Hodgman, “Bettyville”


“Missouri in the springtime is pretty hard to beat, little boy.”
~ Betty Hodgman


Inspired by this year’s One Read selection, we invite Mid-Missouri artists to contribute works that explore the Midwestern landscape, rural communities, family houses or other scenes from this place we call home.

Cash prizes will be awarded for three winners, courtesy of Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs. The third place winner will receive $50, the second place winner $75 and the first place winner $125. The first place winner will also receive a $100 voucher towards a class at the Columbia Art League. Art will be displayed August 28 through September 24 at Orr Street Studios with a reception, awards and program on Tuesday, September 13 at 6:30 p.m.

Submission Details Read More

Suggested One Read: The Maid’s Version

Book cover for The Maid's Version by Daniel WoodrellAll month we have been receiving your suggestions for our 2014 One Read title, and we’ll be highlighting some of these books here at so you can see what other community members are reading and enjoying. All of these titles will be considered by our reading panel as they begin narrowing the list of suggestions in January.

First up is “The Maid’s Version” by Missouri author Daniel Woodrell. Set in the fictional West Table, Missouri, this novel tells the story of a deadly dance hall fire and its impact over several generations. Our nominator writes, “Aside from being well written by a Missouri-based author, the novel really puts the reader in the ‘rural Midwest,’ with each short chapter provoking thoughts of class divisions, economy, historic railroad towns, immigration, the effects of poverty and much more, while still keeping me engaged in solving the mystery of a devastating small town accident. It is also a short read, which means more individuals can read it, tell their neighbors to read it and be ready for the fun-filled month of events!”

There are just a few days remaining to send us your suggestions! Let us know what you think our community should read in 2014 by filling out a suggestion form at any of our branches, the bookmobile, or online at by November 30.