Suggested One Read: Jam on the Vine

Book cover for Jam on the VineAll month Daniel Boone Regional Library is taking your nominations for One Read 2017 and highlighting some of the suggestions we’ve received so far.

An area reader nominated “Jam on the Vine” by LaShonda Barnett. This novel follows the story of Ivoe Williams, an African American woman journalist, through the start of the twentieth century. Our nominator writes: “It’s a historical fiction about what it’s like to be a queer black woman struggling to be a journalist during Jim Crow and starting her own newspaper to address issues of racism, much like Ida B. Wells. An ode to activism that is important for our time. [This novel would be] good for starting conversations on the history of racism locally, given that part of it takes place in Kansas City. It’s always important to have strong female characters to encourage young folks who identify as girls that they can achieve their goals and dreams despite and in spite of all the roadblocks.”

Have a suggestion of your own? You still have a few days to let us know what you think our community should read in 2017 by filling out a suggestion form at any of our branches, the bookmobile, or online at oneread.org.

Suggested One Read: The Language of Flowers

Book cover for The Language of FlowersDuring the month of November we are taking your nominations for One Read 2017 and highlighting some of those nominations here at oneread.org. One local reader recommends “The Language of Flowers” by Vanessa Diffenbaugh. In this novel, Victoria Jones, lacking family or friends, becomes homeless on her 18th birthday. She steals food and sleeps in San Francisco’s McKinley Square, where she covertly plants and tends a small garden, using knowledge learned from one of her previous foster parents. Her gift for flowers helps her change the lives of others even as she struggles to overcome her own past.

Our nominator writes: “It’s a novel that deals with difficult but important topics in an affirming way. What happens to young adults when they age out of foster care? This has been a topic of discussion locally the last couple of years. The book delves into the nature of forgiveness, responsibility and what makes a family. The descriptions of and information about flowers woven throughout could lead to some great programs and discussions.”

What one book do you think our community should read together in 2017? Nominate a title by November 30.

Suggested One Read: Girl in Translation

Book cover for Girl in TranslationEach year a number of books that explore social issues are nominated for One Read. Jean Kwok’s “Girl in Translation” is one such novel.  Main character Kimberly Chang emigrates with her mother from Hong Kong to Brooklyn and begins a secret double life as an exceptional schoolgirl during the day and sweatshop worker at night, an existence also marked by her first crush and the pressure to save her family from poverty.

Our nominator writes, “[This book] clearly demonstrates the misunderstandings possible (often inevitable) between cultures and classes. Wonderful!”

See some of the other titles that have been nominated for One Read 2016.

Suggested One Read: Cutting for Stone

Book cover for Cutting for StoneWe continue to highlight just some of the more than 100 books nominated for One Read 2016.

Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese has been a favorite of book clubs since its publication in 2009. In the novel, twin brothers born from a secret love affair between an Indian nun and a British surgeon in Ethiopia come of age in a country on the brink of revolution, where their love for the same woman drives them apart.

Our nominator writes that book is “an epic story. . . with politics, mystery, love, family, ethics and medicine – this Ethiopian-born doctor tells a story that is close to his heart, opening the reader’s eyes to third-world lives and medical practices and the heroes who work miracles.”

See some of the other titles that have been nominated for One Read 2016.

Suggested One Read: Flight Behavior

Book cover for Flight Behavior by Barbara KingsolverNovelist Barbara Kingsolver is known for using literary fiction to deliver social messages, and her book “Flight Behavior,” nominated for One Read 2014, is no exception with its focus on global warming. Dellarobia Turnbow is a discontent Tennessee farm wife engaging in a flirtatious relationship with a younger man when she discovers what looks like an unusual fire in a forested valley behind her house. This curiosity turns out to be a mass of butterflies, their migration disrupted, which causes a stir in the scientific and local communities, garners a great deal of media attention and leads to Dellarobia confronting and questioning everything she thought she believed in.

An area reader thinks this book would make a great community read: “This book is more than one woman’s migration into self-sufficiency. It deals with ecological, environmental, religious and educational issues in a wryly humorous way.”

Want more book recommendations? See what your friends and neighbors are recommending for One Read.